The Interrupters

Collective Concerts, Indie88 & The Edge Present

The Interrupters

Skinny Lister, Sharp/Shock

Wed, October 30, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm

Rebel

Toronto, ON

$28 - $41

This event is all ages

Advance tickets also available at Rotate This & Soundscapes 

The Interrupters
The Interrupters
The third album from L.A. ska-punk band The Interrupters, Fight the Good Fight gets its title from a piece of graffiti spray-painted outside the studio where they made their debut. “It’s a phrase that’s followed us around for years, and it kind of embodies the message of this album,” says guitarist Kevin Bivona, whose bandmates include singer Aimee Interrupter, bassist Justin Bivona, and drummer Jesse Bivona. Aimee adds: “There’s a lot of darkness in the world right now, but we’re trying to drive that out by making our music the light. We’re fighting through everything with a smile on our faces.”The follow-up to their 2015 album Say It Out Loud, Fight the Good Fight finds The Interrupters delivering their two-tone-inspired, powerfully melodic, punk-fueled sound with more vitality than ever before. Working with Rancid frontman and Grammy Award-winning producer Tim Armstrong (who’s now produced all their albums) and Grammy Award-winning mixer Tom Lord-Alge, Aimee and the Bivona brothers channeled that raw energy in part by recording almost entirely to tape. “There’s a certain feeling you get from that process that you can’t really get digitally,” says Kevin. “There’s no overthinking anything—everyone’s got to be fully present and committed. It was definitely high-pressure, but also really fun.”True to the album’s theme of persevering through hard times, Fight the Good Fight opens with “Title Holder”—a fast-paced anthem that celebrates the notion of “taking all the bad things you’ve overcome and turning them into a beautiful part of your character,” according to Kevin. On “She’s Kerosene,” The Interrupters slip into a more intense but still-triumphant mood as Aimee reflects on breaking free from narcissistic abuse (“I really hope when people listen to that song, it helps them feel empowered to leave a toxic relationship,” she says). Aimee also brings her fearlessly honest storytelling to “Gave You Everything,” an aching but glorious, no-regrets ballad she describes as “a true story, and a story as old as time.”One of the most exhilarating tracks on Fight the Good Fight, “Got Each Other” offers a message of street-punk unity and features vocals from all four members of Rancid (including Armstrong, bassist Matt Freeman, guitarist Lars Frederiksen, and drummer Branden Steineckert). “It was always in the cards for all the guys to be on that song, but we were getting nearer and nearer to deadline, and a few of the verses were still empty,” Kevin recalls. “We ended up having Jesse and Justin drive up to the Bay Area in our tour van with a mini studio in the back, record Matt and Lars, and then drive back down again. It was like the third act of Goodfellas, where the clock was totally working against us, but somehow we made it happen.” In another moment of collaboration, the brash and bouncy “Broken World” was built from a riff and melody passed on by Billie Joe Armstrong while The Interrupters were on tour with Green Day. “Billie Joe played us that riff and melody and told us, ‘If you guys wanna take that and make a song out of it, go for it,’” Kevin remembers. “I think it’s the first ska song he’s ever been a part of, which is a cool thing for us.”
Formed in 2011, The Interrupters got together soon after the Bivona brothers’ former band appeared on bills with Aimee during a 2009 tour. With their self-titled debut arriving in 2014, the band soon shared stages with bands like Rancid, Blink 182 & Bad Religion. In support of Say It Out Loud, they toured all around the world headlining their own shows as well as supporting Green Day in Europe, Australia and South America.Proving their irrepressibility as a live act, the Say It Out Loud run included a Salt Lake City date where Kevin broke his arm after falling off the stage, then immediately duct-taped his fractured limb and completed the set. As they gear up for the release of Fight the Good Fight, The Interrupters hope the album provides some solace to anyone feeling disillusioned. “Music’s gotten me through the toughest times in my life, so now my mission is to give back what I’ve been given—to help other people know that if they feel defeated or not good enough, they’re not alone,” says Aimee. And with appearances at festivals like Punk In Drublic and Warped Tour planned for spring and summer, the band’s especially thrilled to achieve an up-close connection with their audience. “The only time we’re not worrying about what’s going on in the world is when we’re onstage,” says Kevin. “It’s this beautiful escape where it’s just us and the crowd, and everyone’s dancing and having a good time, and hopefully we can all forget about our problems for a while.”
Skinny Lister
Skinny Lister
Skinny Lister are a British folk band formed in London in 2009. Initially performing as a five-piece band until October 2013 when a drummer was added.The band were formed in London in 2009 having met through folk clubs in Greenwich. Prior to forming Skinny Lister, Dan Heptinstall, Sam Brace and Dan Grey had played together in Indie band The Alps.
Dan Gray left the band in the summer of 2012 and was replaced with Michael Camino from Hawaii, USA. In the spring of 2013 Sam Brace left the band and was replaced by Andy "Slim" Black; he has since rejoined. In the autumn of 2013 the band expanded to a six piece with the addition of drummer Dave.[4]

Current members
Dan Heptinstall - lead vocals, guitar, and stomp box (July 2009–present)
Max Thomas - melodeon, mandolin and vocals (July 2009–present)
Lorna Thomas - vocals (July 2009–present)
Thom Mills - drums (March 2014–present)
Sam "Mule" Brace - guitar, concertina, vocals (July 2009- March 2013, September 2014–present) mandolin (2014–present)
Scott Milsom - double bass and vocals (2017 - present)

Past members
Dan Gray (2009 - 2012)
Dave Neale (2013 - 2014)
Andy "Slim" Black (2013 - 2014)
Michael Camino (2012 - 2017
Sharp/Shock
Sharp/Shock
Have you ever heard the inarguable sound of what materializes when you let fate direct the future? What if that sound was influenced by twenty years of British and American punk cultures colliding? For the members of Sharp Shock, growing up with the bands that defined music with an honesty and passion that can be rarely found in modern times, cleared a very obvious path for what they wanted to do with their own lives. Sometimes in music, the storybook tale of determination, sacrifice and despair can be thrown around hastily. To some, those three things describe a reality that very few can truly understand, and for the members of Sharp Shock, they are only a few attributes that make up their unique story.

Having all played in bands from a young age, the work ethic it takes to move your life around the world just isn’t something that most people possess. Playing in garages to arenas and back again, sleeping on floors and in vans for the better part of the last fifteen years, they found their way to Southern California and were pushed only by that dream so many end up letting slip away.

Singer/Guitarist Davey Warsop (Beat Union, Suedehead) and bass player/vocals Dan Smith (The Dear & Departed) are UK exports. Smith by way of New Zealand and also widely known for his achievement in the tattoo world, they both moved to California in the early 2000’s without knowing each other. Korey Kingston (The Aggrolites/Suedehead), a San Diegan drummer raised on a healthy diet of Reggae, Ska and a West Coast view on that same upbringing, would end up completing this trio perfectly. Despite their different geographical beginnings, they quickly realized they were all very much from the same place. “The timing couldn’t have been better” says Smith. “As the story goes, both myself and Korey reached out to Davey by way of text message, coincidentally within a minute of each other, suggesting we start something. We hadn't even met, so i think Davey saw that as some kind of synchronicity, perhaps too much of a coincidence for him to ignore. Then before we knew it, we were already in the studio recording”.

It was only a matter of time before the hiatus they were all experiencing and this coincidence would essentially bring them together. Musically, it is exactly what you might expect kids schooled early on The Jam and Stiff Little Fingers would sound like. Then, submerse that in the sun drenched beach cities of Southern Californian surf,skate and punk culture and the sounds of The Descendents or early Green Day and you will find Sharp Shock. The way the band formed can only be described as organic and after some time away from playing and being rather disheartened with the machine of the music industry and not knowing where they fit in, they all agreed to take much more of a DIY approach this time. Warsop, having produced and engineered countless records over the years at Hurley studios shortly after moving to the US, was a key piece in the productivity of self producing the debut album. “We tracked the majority of this record live, to keep the performances honest and fun. Like our name suggests, we’re trying to keep everything about this band direct and to the point. From the songwriting being short and snappy, to us being a trio…we don’t want to overcomplicate anything.” says Warsop. Sharp Shock had their first record under their belt within a very short amount of time and it would be no surprise if a second wasn’t too far away. “This feels like it did when i was covering my favorite bands in my garage as a kid. We are doing only what we know…and doing it from the heart” say Smith.

Unlearn Everything will be released via Heart & Skull Records this summer.
Venue Information:
Rebel
11 Polson St.
Toronto, ON, M5A 1A4
http://rebeltoronto.com/