Girlpool

Collective Concerts Presents

Girlpool

Hatchie, Claud

Sat, April 20, 2019

Doors: 8:00 pm

Longboat Hall at The Great Hall

Toronto, ON

$17.50

This event is 19 and over

Advance tickets also available at Rotate This & Soundscapes 


Girlpool
Girlpool
The music Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad release as Girlpool occupies a transient space. Their constant evolution makes it perfectly impossible to articulate exactly where their project falls within the contemporary musical canon; this is one of the many reasons Girlpool’s music is so captivating.

Never before has a group’s maturation been so transparently attached to the maturation of its members. This is due in large part to the fact that Girlpool came into existence exactly when Girlpool was supposed to come into existence: at the most prolific stage of the digital revolution. Both online and in the flesh, Tividad and Tucker practice radical openness to the point where it may even engender discomfort; this is exactly the point where it becomes clear why theirs’ is such a special project: they accept the possibility of discomfort—Chaos—and show you how to figure out why you might feel it. This is achieved through their ability to empathize as best friends and partners in creation, with the intention of making music that provokes.

They met in November of 2013, and released their self-titled EP just 3 months later. Both were playing in multiple bands at the time. Harmony was 18. Cleo was 17.

The growth they have fostered in one another over the years explains the project’s disparate discography; each record is a photograph of Girlpool, growing over time. Their roots are a certain shade of punk—organized chaos dressed as earworms. “Where You Sink,” one of the first singles off their upcoming record, What Chaos Is Imaginary, gives you an idea of how much things have changed since 2014.

It’s not all good.

“I was experiencing a lot of mental health issues,” says Tividad of the title. “That song comes from a place of being disconnected from reality. The world is so complicated. It's hard to believe in magic, or that anything exists.” Notice the order: magic, then the principle existence of things. A peak into Harmony.

Though it is the 3rd track on Girlpool’s newest record, “Where You Sink” was written at a time when the two were living in different states on the East Coast. It proved to be a period of immense change for the both of them; each focused—more than they ever had before—on their solo music.

“Before, we would build our songs together with four hands, from the ground up,” says Tucker, referring to the songwriting process that produced the debut EP and 2015’s critically acclaimed follow-up, Before The World Was Big. “Our songs used to be intertwined in a different way. We brought our separate experiences to the songs that we crafted together, we valued understanding that they were multidimensional.”

Their solo work consistently breathes new life into Girlpool. The two have since become comfortable with the process being more independent, more fluid. They both take part in the production and arrangement of the music, but they’ve strayed from beginning hand in hand in every instance. They connect somewhere along the way, working together when it feels right.

Discussing the new process, Harmony says, “It’s helped me find validity in parts of my writing I found to be unapproachable. I thought my stream-of-consciousness was unsophisticated.” There’s probably a great pun available re: shedding self-consciousness to release a more sophisticated stream-of-consciousness. In any case, What Chaos is Imaginary—the record and the song—is what the stream looks like when self-consciousness is shed.

Where Harmony embraces chaos, Cleo organizes it. “It’s hard for me to feel completion without achieving a vision that I have. I’ll imagine the kind of climate I want to create inside a song,” says Cleo of his process. “Once I fall in love with the direction, it’s getting there that can take time.” Finishing a song may take time and even prove to be difficult for him at times, but the product is invariably polished. Considering the near-perfect balance in the songs on What Chaos is Imaginary, their dynamic makes sense. “It took a really long time to record this record. It feels like a photograph of a very transitional time.”

What Chaos is Imaginary is a collection of songs unlike any Girlpool songs you’ve ever heard, exactly what Powerplant was to Before The World Was Big. For the first time, it is clear who wrote what song. 2019 will see drum machines and synthesizers and beautiful/new harmonies and huge guitars and at least one orchestral breakdown by a string octet.

“It was invigorating playing stripped down and raw when Girlpool began. As we change, what gets us there is going to change too.”

It’s hard to imagine what might follow What Chaos is Imaginary. Girlpool’s growth has a steady momentum forward, towards something greater with every stride that they take. By the time the record comes out, they’ll be far from here, wherever here is.
Hatchie
Hatchie
On her debut EP Sugar & Spice, Hatchie delivered the sonic equivalent of falling
deliriously in love: a sustained rush of feeling, rendered in swoony melodies and gauzy
guitar tones and endlessly hypnotic layers of sound. Now, with her full-length debut
Keepsake, the Australian singer/songwriter tries on countless new textures, exploring
everything from industrial to new wave to dance-pop, handling each with understated
elegance and pure, powerful feeling.

In the making of Keepsake, the Brisbane-bred musician otherwise known as Harriette
Pilbeam recorded in a home studio in Melbourne and worked again with John Castle—
the producer behind Sugar & Spice, a 2018 release that prompted Pitchfork to dub her
the “dream-pop idol of tomorrow.” And while the album begins and ends with two
massively catchy pop tracks—the brightly defiant “Not That Kind,” the euphoric and epic
“Keep”—many songs drift into more emotionally tangled terrain, shedding light on
experiences both ephemeral and life-changing.

Throughout Keepsake, Hatchie’s kaleidoscopic sonic palette draws out distinct moods
and tones, continually revealing her depth and imagination as a musician and
songwriter. On lead single “Without a Blush,” jagged guitar riffs and woozy rhythms
meet in a sprawling piece of industrial-pop, with Hatchie’s gorgeously airy voice
channeling loss and longing, regret and self-doubt. Another industrial-leaning track,
“Unwanted Guest” unfolds in wobbly synth lines and fantastically icy spoken-word
vocals, along with lyrics about “being dragged to a party I don’t want to be at, then
getting at a fight at the party, and kind of hating myself for it but hating everybody else
too.” Meanwhile, on “Her Own Heart,” Hatchie presents a radiant jangle-pop gem that
puts a singular twist on the post-breakup narrative. “I’d seen people in my life go
through breakups and end up with no idea what to do with themselves,” she says. “I
wrote that song from the point of view of a girl who winds up on her own and embraces
having to figure out who she is, who doesn’t let her life get turned upside-down like
that.”

Elsewhere on Keepsake, Hatchie brings an unlikely transcendence to the most tender
of moments. With its softly pulsing beats and slow-building intensity, “Secret” spins a
heartrending anthem from what she describes as “confiding to a friend about your
mental health struggles, the things you can’t work out on your own.” On “Kiss the Stars,”
Hatchie’s cascading guitar work and mesmeric vocals meet with lyrics capturing a
precise form of melancholy. “With that song, I wanted to recreate the feeling of a
Sunday afternoon when the sun is setting and you don’t want the day to be over—that
awful end-of-weekend feeling,” she says. And on “Stay With Me,” Hatchie offers up
Keepsake’s most utterly rhapsodic track, all incandescent synth and unstoppable
rhythm. “At first I thought I could never put that on my album—it felt too dancey and
pop, and I figured it could really shine on someone else’s record,” she says. “But then I
realized: I’m the one dictating what my sound is; what I put on my album is up to me.”
That self-possessed spirit infuses all of Keepsake, which ultimately serves as a
document of a particularly kinetic moment in Hatchie’s life. “I’m not much of a nostalgic
person when it comes to memories, but I do have a tendency to hold on to certain
things, like tickets from the first time I went someplace on holiday,” says Hatchie in
reflecting on the album’s title. “It made sense to me to call the record that, at a time
when I’m going to probably end up with a lot of keepsakes—and in a way, this whole
album is almost like a keepsake in itself.”
Claud
Claud
Claud is the solo project of Claud Mintz. After releasing their debut EP made out of their college dorm room under the name Toast with Terrible Records, Claud dropped out of Syracuse University to move forward with their music career. Since then they've toured and played with the likes of The María's, Clairo, Triathalon, and more. After being sued by Wonder Bread and making the name change -- Claud is now working with various collaborators and will be sharing new music -- a new chapter following the project formerly known as Toast.
Venue Information:
Longboat Hall at The Great Hall
1087 Queen St. W
Toronto, ON, M6J 1H3
http://www.thegreathall.ca/longboat-hall/