SWMRS, The Interrupters

Collective Concerts Presents

SWMRS

The Interrupters

The Regrettes, Goodbye Honolulu

Sat, December 2, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm

The Opera House

Toronto, ON

$17.50

Sold Out

This event is all ages

SWMRS
SWMRS
SWMRS is Cole Becker (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), Max Becker (lead vocals, lead guitar), Joey Armstrong (drums, backing vocals), and Sebastian Mueller (bass, backing vocals). The band emerged in early 2015 through the dissolution of previous project Emily's Army. In the grand tradition of punk rock, Cole Becker and friend Joey Armstrong formed the band before even learning to play their instruments, after watching the movie School of Rock at age eight. Drawing influence from seminal pop-punk acts like The Ramones and The Clash, the Beckers and Armstrong released two full-length records and a handful of EPs before graduating high school. The band toured the world, sharing stages with the likes of Pennywise, Rise Against, The Aquabats, Gerard Way, and Soundgarden, and appeared at Reading and Leeds festivals, Warped Tour, and Soundwave, before pursuing a new musical endeavor with a broader sonic palate. The new band solidified its lineup as Max Becker made the switch from bass to lead guitar and Armstrong taught friend Sebastian Mueller to play the bass. SWMRS attributes the emotional lyrical content and slicker production of their new material to diverse influences ranging from Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest to Pavement, Weezer, and Nirvana.
The Interrupters
The Interrupters
The third album from L.A. ska-punk band The Interrupters, Fight the Good Fight gets its title from a piece of graffiti spray-painted outside the studio where they made their debut. “It’s a phrase that’s followed us around for years, and it kind of embodies the message of this album,” says guitarist Kevin Bivona, whose bandmates include singer Aimee Interrupter, bassist Justin Bivona, and drummer Jesse Bivona. Aimee adds: “There’s a lot of darkness in the world right now, but we’re trying to drive that out by making our music the light. We’re fighting through everything with a smile on our faces.”The follow-up to their 2015 album Say It Out Loud, Fight the Good Fight finds The Interrupters delivering their two-tone-inspired, powerfully melodic, punk-fueled sound with more vitality than ever before. Working with Rancid frontman and Grammy Award-winning producer Tim Armstrong (who’s now produced all their albums) and Grammy Award-winning mixer Tom Lord-Alge, Aimee and the Bivona brothers channeled that raw energy in part by recording almost entirely to tape. “There’s a certain feeling you get from that process that you can’t really get digitally,” says Kevin. “There’s no overthinking anything—everyone’s got to be fully present and committed. It was definitely high-pressure, but also really fun.”True to the album’s theme of persevering through hard times, Fight the Good Fight opens with “Title Holder”—a fast-paced anthem that celebrates the notion of “taking all the bad things you’ve overcome and turning them into a beautiful part of your character,” according to Kevin. On “She’s Kerosene,” The Interrupters slip into a more intense but still-triumphant mood as Aimee reflects on breaking free from narcissistic abuse (“I really hope when people listen to that song, it helps them feel empowered to leave a toxic relationship,” she says). Aimee also brings her fearlessly honest storytelling to “Gave You Everything,” an aching but glorious, no-regrets ballad she describes as “a true story, and a story as old as time.”One of the most exhilarating tracks on Fight the Good Fight, “Got Each Other” offers a message of street-punk unity and features vocals from all four members of Rancid (including Armstrong, bassist Matt Freeman, guitarist Lars Frederiksen, and drummer Branden Steineckert). “It was always in the cards for all the guys to be on that song, but we were getting nearer and nearer to deadline, and a few of the verses were still empty,” Kevin recalls. “We ended up having Jesse and Justin drive up to the Bay Area in our tour van with a mini studio in the back, record Matt and Lars, and then drive back down again. It was like the third act of Goodfellas, where the clock was totally working against us, but somehow we made it happen.” In another moment of collaboration, the brash and bouncy “Broken World” was built from a riff and melody passed on by Billie Joe Armstrong while The Interrupters were on tour with Green Day. “Billie Joe played us that riff and melody and told us, ‘If you guys wanna take that and make a song out of it, go for it,’” Kevin remembers. “I think it’s the first ska song he’s ever been a part of, which is a cool thing for us.”
Formed in 2011, The Interrupters got together soon after the Bivona brothers’ former band appeared on bills with Aimee during a 2009 tour. With their self-titled debut arriving in 2014, the band soon shared stages with bands like Rancid, Blink 182 & Bad Religion. In support of Say It Out Loud, they toured all around the world headlining their own shows as well as supporting Green Day in Europe, Australia and South America.Proving their irrepressibility as a live act, the Say It Out Loud run included a Salt Lake City date where Kevin broke his arm after falling off the stage, then immediately duct-taped his fractured limb and completed the set. As they gear up for the release of Fight the Good Fight, The Interrupters hope the album provides some solace to anyone feeling disillusioned. “Music’s gotten me through the toughest times in my life, so now my mission is to give back what I’ve been given—to help other people know that if they feel defeated or not good enough, they’re not alone,” says Aimee. And with appearances at festivals like Punk In Drublic and Warped Tour planned for spring and summer, the band’s especially thrilled to achieve an up-close connection with their audience. “The only time we’re not worrying about what’s going on in the world is when we’re onstage,” says Kevin. “It’s this beautiful escape where it’s just us and the crowd, and everyone’s dancing and having a good time, and hopefully we can all forget about our problems for a while.”
The Regrettes
The Regrettes
Perfectly imperfect – that's one way to describe LA based punk act, The Regrettes. Writing songs that proudly bear a brazen and unabashed attitude in the vein of acts Courtney Barnett or Karen O – with a pop aesthetic reminiscent of 50's and 60's acts a la the Temptations or Buddy Holly – the LA based four piece create infectious, punk driven tracks.

Lead by outspoken frontwoman, Lydia Night, and comprised of Genessa Gariano on guitar, Sage Nicole on bass and drummer Maxx Morando, the group have left the LA rock scene floored, managing to capture the hearts of jaded rock critics while opening for acts like Kate Nash, Jack Off Jill, Bleached, Pins, Deep Vally and more. With nothing but demos available online, the group are already beginning to generate hype, from outlets like NPR, and with NYLON already heralding them them as a "punk act you should be listening to".

From the opening moments on a track by The Regrettes, we're greeted with a wall of guitars, infectious melodies and a wistful nostalgia that continues right until the final notes. Taking cues from acts like Hinds and Hole, there's a wistful sense of youth and vulnerability that lies at the heart of each song.

A song by The Regrettes is, essentially, a diary entry into Lydia's life. "My music is a spectrum of every emotion that I have felt in the last year, and you can hear that when you hear the songs. Everything that is happening in my life influences me. It's everything from boys, to friends, to being pissed off at people, to being really sad. Just everything."

The most intoxicating draw of The Regrettes is their bashful, heart-on-your-sleeve temperament – writing urgent and fast-paced pop songs with a punk rock mentality. "The way that we write, it's all based on honesty," muses Lydia on the group's punk aesthetic. "If I finish a song, I'll just leave it – I won't really go back to it. I like things to feel in the moment and I don't want it to be perfect. If I work on something too much I lose it and get bored and I want to do the next one.."

First song, "A Living Human Girl," best showcases the vulnerability of the group's lyrics. Singing about a less than perfect complexion, a bra size that is considered smaller than most, and those little red bumps you get when you shave, The Regrettes aren't afraid to embrace their imperfections. "Sometimes I'm pretty and sometimes I'm not", sings Lydia over 60's inspired guitar riffs and a kicked back drum beat. "I don't remember exactly what sparked it, but I remember when I wrote those lyrics, I was just really angry."

"There are times when you feel really insecure and you really don't like yourself, so I wrote it for people who feel that and I wrote it for myself. I just felt like there wasn't a song like that out there. A song that if I was feeling super shitty about myself, that I could listen to. I wanted something that would make girls and boys feel confident," she explains.

Lydia's not afraid to have her feelings on display. "I am not scared of anyone judging me, I don't care. I don't give a fuck if someone doesn't like what I have to say. For every person that likes you, there's a person that doesn't like you. No matter what, if people can relate to the music then it's worth it. That's what is cool for me." And at the end of the day, isn't that what punk music is all about?
Goodbye Honolulu
Goodbye Honolulu met in school and have been playing in each other’s bands for years. They started their own record label while still in school, the 100% local Toronto label Fried Records. While other kids were cramming for exams or wasting away playing video games, the Goodbye Honolulu boys were busy playing in bars (attempting to sneak their underage friends in), honing their live skills, writing songs and self releasing multiple albums a year.



These teenage years were laying the foundations and as they hit their 20s Emmett, Jacob, Fox and Max decided to join forces and focus their song-writing and energy to one project, say “hello” to Goodbye Honolulu.



Goodbye Honolulu, evoke a 90s slacker vibe mixing vintage garage rock n roll history with modern elements, it’s not exactly pop and it’s not exactly punk.



Goodbye Honolulu is best known for their live shows and in best form when every member is screaming their heads off with shout along choruses. Whether it’s Emmett’s fuzz-layered guitar, Jacob’s gnarly vocals, Fox’s Bowie-inspired vocal inflections or Max beating his drum kit to death, Goodbye Honolulu make their audience the VIP guests to their rock n roll party.


Highlights of Goodbye Honolulu’s ride so far include a USA tour supporting their pals Hinds, releasing their debut album Heavy Gold (2016) and their sophomore release No Honey (2017).
Venue Information:
The Opera House
735 Queen Street East
Toronto, ON, M4M 1H1
http://www.theoperahousetoronto.com/